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file Supergirl as a guest star

28 Dec 2016 23:31 #51956 by ace191
Replied by ace191 on topic Supergirl as a guest star
So much changed so fast in America from 1963 to 1969 that it was really hard to believe. Race relations with riots and assassinations, women's lib, putting guys in orbit vs to the moon and back, nuclear confrontation and the arms race
And a generational gap that developed over drugs and the Vietnam war. Tune in, turn on, drop out and don't trust anyone over 30 ( like say Nixon or Kissinger).

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29 Dec 2016 06:50 #51960 by shadar
Replied by shadar on topic Supergirl as a guest star

ace191 wrote: So much changed so fast in America from 1963 to 1969 that it was really hard to believe. Race relations with riots and assassinations, women's lib, putting guys in orbit vs to the moon and back, nuclear confrontation and the arms race
And a generational gap that developed over drugs and the Vietnam war. Tune in, turn on, drop out and don't trust anyone over 30 ( like say Nixon or Kissinger).


It's very hard to actually understand what that period was like from the perspectives of the 1980's and beyond. I've seen or read so many perspectives on the time, but none of them really get it right (at least from my perspective). I turned 20 in 1968, so I pretty much got the full deal. People who are significantly older (born in mid-1940's or earlier) often think it was a crazy, nutty, scary time with all the institutions and culture being questioned and upended. Anarchy in their minds. Young women suddenly owned their own bodies thanks to the pill, and they could become extremely sexual without being looked down upon or worrying about pregnancy. Free love. Anything you could catch during sex could be easily cured. This was before AIDS, before Herpes, etc. The sexual revolution only affected a narrow age group, but it was badly misunderstood by those who were older. None of that made it to the comics of the time.

It was like a tightly wound spring had been released and everything moved forward in a big jump, and in all directions. But it was also a violent period, both in civil society and thanks to a bloody war with 50+ thousand dead and many times that badly wounded, most of them conscripts who were drafted against their will. Everyone had dead friends thanks to the war, or they escaped to Canada or whatever.

The comics of the time didn't really mirror any of that. They were far too establishment-oriented. That changed a little in the 70's as comic writers tried to get hip, but it still wasn't done well. Off key and understated and fake. Written by people over 30 who obviously didn't get it.
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29 Dec 2016 15:29 #51967 by five_red
Replied by five_red on topic Supergirl as a guest star

shadar wrote: The comics of the time didn't really mirror any of that. They were far too establishment-oriented. That changed a little in the 70's as comic writers tried to get hip, but it still wasn't done well. Off key and understated and fake. Written by people over 30 who obviously didn't get it.


Comics of the 1960s suffered under the domineering hand of the Comics Code Authority, a body set up to placate the 50s moral panic that pulp magazines were corrupting the minds of innocent kids. In the 60s superheroes were not selling as well as other comicbook genres, and (famously) Marvel almost abandoned the field entirely. Fortunately they didn't, and instead they accidentally hit upon a formula that reinvigorated the genre -- aligning heroes firmly with teenage culture. Yet while Marvel gained a cult following on college campuses, DC still saw its main source of superhero revenue as coming from licensing deals with television, breakfast cereals, etc. Such deals with blue-chip brands required a squeaky-clean image, and this is why DC's output at the time is very conservative and 'square'.

The simple fact is that Stan Lee could get away with making his characters more counter-culture, because Marvel's characters weren't expected to appear in prime time slots on national tv networks, or in promotional offers with big brands.

The final straw came when DC's biggest licensing success of the mid-Sixties was not a straight adaptation of a DC superhero, but a parody of their ultra-square house style (the Adam West Batman show, in case you hadn't guessed, that boosted sales of DC's superhero titles across the board.) By the mid-1960s a new generation of writers and artists were entering comicbooks, ones that had grown up with superheroes. As old fashioned editors like Mort Weisinger (who didn't even agree with stories spanning more than one issue) stepped aside, slowly from 1967 onward DC started to change its house style, largely thanks to president/publisher Carmine Infantino. But comics were still dominated by men, and the people at the very top (like Lee and Infantino) were still from the old Golden Age era. So we got a lot of very worthy, but misguided, attempts to "do feminism". We all recall The Cat, Ms. Marvel, Spider-Woman, etc.

It is ironic that the period with the strongest female heroines is probably not the Silver or Bronze Age (the period when second wave feminism actually started to bite), but the war years of the Golden Age. Blonde Phantom, Invisible Scarlett O'Neill, Purple Tigress, Lady Luck, Scorpion, Phantom Lady, Miss America, Liberty Belle, Ms. Victory... the list is nearly endless. But by the Silver Age only Wonder Woman survived from that period.


R5

ps. Shocked that so many people didn't recognise Milla. She surely has to be one of the most famous cosplayers out there.

Supergirl Pre-Crisis Chronology: www.superwomenmania.com/supergirltl/
Supergirl: the Life and Times of Kara Zor-El: maidofmight.wordpress.com/
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