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Drive director wanted Christina Hendricks as Wonder Woman

28 Jun 2016 23:39 #48903 by fats
hi all,

Nicolas Winding Refn has been making the rounds to discuss the inspiration behind The Neon Demon, his latest twisted thriller about the pursuit of youth and beauty in the modeling industry at whatever means necessary.

While the arty Elle Fanning vehicle is Refn's first real go at a female-centric film, the Danish director behind macho flicks Drive and Valhalla Rising has always had his eye on putting a woman at the forefront - in particular an extremely powerful superheroine.

more here www.maxim.com/entertainment/drive-direct...-wonder-woman-2016-6

Fats

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29 Jun 2016 01:28 #48905 by rebel4life
She doesn't have the physique, anyways. Wonder Woman is more than tits, she's strongly built overall.

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29 Jun 2016 03:44 #48906 by Markiehoe
She could fill out the suit ok by me.

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29 Jun 2016 11:42 #48912 by kikass2014
While Christina Hendricks would not be my first choice as Wonder Woman, *checks again*, yup, wouldn't complain at all if she was chosen :P

Peace.

/K

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29 Jun 2016 15:24 #48913 by Monty
He says later on in the article. He's focusing on Barbara Gordon's batgirl. Christina would make an awesome batgirl.☺

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29 Jun 2016 18:00 #48914 by Markiehoe
Christina is too old to play Batgirl.
You need a young looking twentysomething .

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29 Jun 2016 18:20 #48916 by shadar

Markiehoe wrote: Christina is too old to play Batgirl.
You need a young looking twentysomething .


Agree with Markiehoe... young, fit and full of attitude. But then, that pretty much applies to every superheroine in my book.

There is nothing good (at least from a fantasy perspective) about older, more gravity-prone women.

But there is something fascinating about a superheroine having had some life experiences. That's what made Jessica Jones special. For all of us who have fought in wars and/or otherwise accumulated some damage (mental and/or physical) over the years, a lot can be said for the dramatic exploration of dealing with that damage while trying to do good and not succumbing to bitterness, regret or anger. Or more importantly, fear.

That's a battle that's interesting to me these days. One that Wonder Woman could portray, but is more likely to reveal itself with Ms Marvel/Captain Marvel. They don't have to go full Jessica Jones, but it's important for me to see how someone with experiences (good and bad ones, horrible mistakes and all) deals with using their powers in the world as we know it today.

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30 Jun 2016 01:24 #48921 by TwiceOnThursdays
Replied by TwiceOnThursdays on topic Drive director wanted Christina Hendricks as Wonder Woman

shadar wrote:

Markiehoe wrote: Christina is too old to play Batgirl.
You need a young looking twentysomething .


Agree with Markiehoe... young, fit and full of attitude. But then, that pretty much applies to every superheroine in my book.

There is nothing good (at least from a fantasy perspective) about older, more gravity-prone women.

But there is something fascinating about a superheroine having had some life experiences. That's what made Jessica Jones special. For all of us who have fought in wars and/or otherwise accumulated some damage (mental and/or physical) over the years, a lot can be said for the dramatic exploration of dealing with that damage while trying to do good and not succumbing to bitterness, regret or anger. Or more importantly, fear.

That's a battle that's interesting to me these days. One that Wonder Woman could portray, but is more likely to reveal itself with Ms Marvel/Captain Marvel. They don't have to go full Jessica Jones, but it's important for me to see how someone with experiences (good and bad ones, horrible mistakes and all) deals with using their powers in the world as we know it today.


There's an article over on Mary Sue today about trauma in the MCU: www.themarysue.com/mcu-trauma/ , and it fits right into your comment.

I think most of this stuff is purposely out in a lot of the treatment. Jessica Jones they didn't even cover in the article because it's what the entire story is about.

Some of it is pretty overt (Stark in Iron Man 3), but I think they're fairly consistent with Sam Wilson, Rodgers, Barnes and Widow too. I guess Sam Mackie in some interview talked about how the Russo's talked over his characters past trauma and how he'd react to it in the War Machine episode, so they're purposely thinking of these things (with little nods to it in Winter Soldier and Civil War). (As well as Wilson's reaction to Barnes, since dealing with PTSD is what he does...)

Even Ant-Man is dealing with some trauma (jail/separation from his family, and he's driven by the need to be worth his new life/family). You even see Vision being conflicted (and guilt ridden post War Machine). Who on the Avengers/in Civil War ISN'T dealing with some kind of trauma that directly affects their actions? Perhaps Spider-Man is the only one they didn't establish his trauma (but we all know what it is...).

So it does seem fairly certain that we'll see issues like this dealt with in Captain Marvel.

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30 Jun 2016 04:07 - 30 Jun 2016 04:08 #48922 by shadar

TwiceOnThursdays wrote:

shadar wrote:

Markiehoe wrote: Christina is too old to play Batgirl.
You need a young looking twentysomething .


Agree with Markiehoe... young, fit and full of attitude. But then, that pretty much applies to every superheroine in my book.

There is nothing good (at least from a fantasy perspective) about older, more gravity-prone women.

But there is something fascinating about a superheroine having had some life experiences. That's what made Jessica Jones special. For all of us who have fought in wars and/or otherwise accumulated some damage (mental and/or physical) over the years, a lot can be said for the dramatic exploration of dealing with that damage while trying to do good and not succumbing to bitterness, regret or anger. Or more importantly, fear.

That's a battle that's interesting to me these days. One that Wonder Woman could portray, but is more likely to reveal itself with Ms Marvel/Captain Marvel. They don't have to go full Jessica Jones, but it's important for me to see how someone with experiences (good and bad ones, horrible mistakes and all) deals with using their powers in the world as we know it today.


There's an article over on Mary Sue today about trauma in the MCU: www.themarysue.com/mcu-trauma/ , and it fits right into your comment.

I think most of this stuff is purposely out in a lot of the treatment. Jessica Jones they didn't even cover in the article because it's what the entire story is about.

Some of it is pretty overt (Stark in Iron Man 3), but I think they're fairly consistent with Sam Wilson, Rodgers, Barnes and Widow too. I guess Sam Mackie in some interview talked about how the Russo's talked over his characters past trauma and how he'd react to it in the War Machine episode, so they're purposely thinking of these things (with little nods to it in Winter Soldier and Civil War). (As well as Wilson's reaction to Barnes, since dealing with PTSD is what he does...)

Even Ant-Man is dealing with some trauma (jail/separation from his family, and he's driven by the need to be worth his new life/family). You even see Vision being conflicted (and guilt ridden post War Machine). Who on the Avengers/in Civil War ISN'T dealing with some kind of trauma that directly affects their actions? Perhaps Spider-Man is the only one they didn't establish his trauma (but we all know what it is...).

So it does seem fairly certain that we'll see issues like this dealt with in Captain Marvel.


Good article... tks for the link.

In Wonder Woman's case, I'm not sure how much trauma affects her. She and Superman always seemed above all that (which sometimes diminishes my appreciation of both characters). Not sure how they portray this with Gal Gadot WW yet.

The Marvel characters suffer from a lot of trauma, and even bright, cheery Supergirl (especially Melissa's version) has issues related to losing her family, her planet, pretty much her whole species.

The big difference is that there are two kinds of trauma. There is type that Supergirl endured. She didn't have anything to do with Krypton's demise, she was just a victim.

The other kind of trauma, which is much more difficult to deal with, is the Jessica Jones variety. She remembers doing horrible things that killed and maimed people who didn't deserve it. That can be even worse than combat-induced PTSD, where you may have done terrible things in the necessity of war. And maybe you stepped over the line a bit and carry that guilt. Supergirl has none of that. Presumably WW doesn't either.

I'd like to see Supergirl in Season 2 make a big mistake and have to live with it. You could argue there were some mild examples in Season 1, but I don't think we saw her response to traumatic events increasing over the season.

I guess the bottom line is that interesting heroic characters need to have skeletons and ghosts rattling around in their heads in ways that influence their behavior. Overcoming their PTSD is part of their heroism.
Last edit: 30 Jun 2016 04:08 by shadar.

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30 Jun 2016 07:27 #48924 by castor

shadar wrote:

TwiceOnThursdays wrote:

shadar wrote:

Markiehoe wrote: Christina is too old to play Batgirl.
You need a young looking twentysomething .


Agree with Markiehoe... young, fit and full of attitude. But then, that pretty much applies to every superheroine in my book.

There is nothing good (at least from a fantasy perspective) about older, more gravity-prone women.

But there is something fascinating about a superheroine having had some life experiences. That's what made Jessica Jones special. For all of us who have fought in wars and/or otherwise accumulated some damage (mental and/or physical) over the years, a lot can be said for the dramatic exploration of dealing with that damage while trying to do good and not succumbing to bitterness, regret or anger. Or more importantly, fear.

That's a battle that's interesting to me these days. One that Wonder Woman could portray, but is more likely to reveal itself with Ms Marvel/Captain Marvel. They don't have to go full Jessica Jones, but it's important for me to see how someone with experiences (good and bad ones, horrible mistakes and all) deals with using their powers in the world as we know it today.


There's an article over on Mary Sue today about trauma in the MCU: www.themarysue.com/mcu-trauma/ , and it fits right into your comment.

I think most of this stuff is purposely out in a lot of the treatment. Jessica Jones they didn't even cover in the article because it's what the entire story is about.

Some of it is pretty overt (Stark in Iron Man 3), but I think they're fairly consistent with Sam Wilson, Rodgers, Barnes and Widow too. I guess Sam Mackie in some interview talked about how the Russo's talked over his characters past trauma and how he'd react to it in the War Machine episode, so they're purposely thinking of these things (with little nods to it in Winter Soldier and Civil War). (As well as Wilson's reaction to Barnes, since dealing with PTSD is what he does...)

Even Ant-Man is dealing with some trauma (jail/separation from his family, and he's driven by the need to be worth his new life/family). You even see Vision being conflicted (and guilt ridden post War Machine). Who on the Avengers/in Civil War ISN'T dealing with some kind of trauma that directly affects their actions? Perhaps Spider-Man is the only one they didn't establish his trauma (but we all know what it is...).

So it does seem fairly certain that we'll see issues like this dealt with in Captain Marvel.


Good article... tks for the link.

In Wonder Woman's case, I'm not sure how much trauma affects her. She and Superman always seemed above all that (which sometimes diminishes my appreciation of both characters). Not sure how they portray this with Gal Gadot WW yet.

The Marvel characters suffer from a lot of trauma, and even bright, cheery Supergirl (especially Melissa's version) has issues related to losing her family, her planet, pretty much her whole species.

The big difference is that there are two kinds of trauma. There is type that Supergirl endured. She didn't have anything to do with Krypton's demise, she was just a victim.

The other kind of trauma, which is much more difficult to deal with, is the Jessica Jones variety. She remembers doing horrible things that killed and maimed people who didn't deserve it. That can be even worse than combat-induced PTSD, where you may have done terrible things in the necessity of war. And maybe you stepped over the line a bit and carry that guilt. Supergirl has none of that. Presumably WW doesn't either.

I'd like to see Supergirl in Season 2 make a big mistake and have to live with it. You could argue there were some mild examples in Season 1, but I don't think we saw her response to traumatic events increasing over the season.

I guess the bottom line is that interesting heroic characters need to have skeletons and ghosts rattling around in their heads in ways that influence their behavior. Overcoming their PTSD is part of their heroism.


This is an intresting point visa vie Batgirl-cause in her original incarnation one of her defining featres is her freedomfrom trauma. Her parents where fine, shes not an alien- Shes simply a bright, athletic girl who discovers somewhat by accident that she can be a superhero-she has that in her,and it is *her*. And she likes it It may hurt sometimes and maybe overwealming but i do think the defining feature of Batgirl is in someway joy.

And that can be just as intresting as characters with traumatic past or dealing with issues-cause well its also an emotion. Its not as complex a one but it is an intresting one. I will say this. i would like a Wonder Woman film, but to a certain extent i would be more intrested in a him doing a batgirl film. He is a master at letting a face tell a story, and that kinda story could intresting

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